In God we trust. All others, we virus scan.- Anonymous

Computer security can simply be protecting your equipment and files from disgruntled employees, spies, and anything that goes bump in the night, but there is much more. Computer security helps ensure that your computers, networks, and peripherals work as expected all the time, and that your data is safe in the event of hard disk crash or a power failure resulting from an electrical storm. Computer security also makes sure no damage is done to your data and that no one is able to read it unless you want them to. — Bruce Schneier (Protect Your Macintosh, 1994)

Hardware is easy to protect: lock it in a room, chain it to a desk, or buy a spare. Information poses more of a problem. It can exist in more than one place; be transported halfway across the planet in seconds; and be stolen without your knowledge.— Bruce Schneier (Protect Your Macintosh, 1994)

People often represent the weakest link in the security chain and are chronically responsible for the failure of security systems. — Bruce Schneier, Secrets and Lies

I personally like to think of the Internet as a parallel universe, a cyber-world as opposed to the real-world. In cyber-world people do much the same thing as in the real-world, such as chat, work, or go shopping. And, as in the real-world, there are dangers. In the real-world, we spend years as children learning about the world and all its dangers before we can safely go out on our own. This is not the case in cyber-world. People wander into cyber-world as cyber-toddlers or even cyber-infants. How can these people be expected to look after themselves in this strange new world? … I believe that education must be the first step to computer security. Cyber-world is too complex and dangerous to jump into without understanding the dangers.— Jimi Loo, in Comments & Feedback to Noam Eppel’s Article, “Security Absurdity: The Complete, Unquestionable, and Total Failure of Information Security. A long-overdue wake up call for the security community.”